FROM PROMISE TO FULFILLMENT, Part 9.


“God causes all things to work together for good”


This is a continuation of the story of Engineer F. M. Perry’s involvement with the construction and start-up operation of The World Christian Broadcasting Corporation’s international short wave radio station KNLS at Anchor Point, Alaska.

______________________________________________________________________________


June 1982 -


F. M. and son, Charlie, drove a 1979 Chevy Suburban, with an old model Airstream trailer attached behind, out of northern Virginia on about June 1, 1982 and arrived in Anchor Point on or about June 14, 1982. They had heard stories about the flying gravel on the AlCan highway that often broke headlights and front windows in trailers. So they equipped the Suburban with plastic covers over the headlights and the trailer with a plywood covering over the front window. The total length of the trip was 4600 miles of which about 1500 miles, on the AlCan (or Alaska) Highway, was gravel surfaced road. The trip was exciting and without unusual incident. They crossed the border into Canada from the state of North Dakota. The AlCan Highway was in better condition than expected having been straightened and improved during the years after its first construction during World War II. Road side refueling services and over night accommodations were also better than expected on the AlCan. Every night they found good accommodations for trailer parking with hook-ups for water, sewer, and electricity.


When F. M. and Charlie rolled into Anchor Point they went directly to the home/business establishment of Forrest (Bud) and Harriet Kinder, members of the Anchor Point Church of Christ, who had promised to have reserved for them a place in their side yard with water, sewer, and electricity hook-ups for trailer parking. The Kinder’s had the place to park the trailer ready and waiting for them. Charlotte had a ticket to fly to Anchorage from Dulles Airport, Washington, DC, on June 21. So there was ample time for them to get the trailer hooked-up and drive the Suburban back to Anchorage to meet Charlotte’s plane. Conveniently, F. M.’s sister, Isabella, still resided in Anchorage and provided accommodations for them whenever they came through the city of Anchorage.


The first few weeks in Anchor Point F. M. and Charlotte lived in the trailer. Charlie stayed on for a few days sleeping at night in his tent pitched near the trailer. Then he returned by air to his home and job in Nashville, Tennessee.

When F. M. arrived in Anchor Point he found that Kevin Chambers had made progress already with some work on the site. The following letter was waiting for him:


“June 14, 1982


“F. M.:


“I’m sorry that I’m away. We are helping the Bailey’s get settled in their fish site [located across Cook Inlet from Anchor Point]. We are scheduled to get home sometime Saturday June 19 weather permitting.


“The clearing of the road right of way is started. The timber has been cut up to the approximate location of the parking lot. There has been some last minute problems with the skidding [movement of logs]. I’m sure I can get things started next week. I will need some money both for Bill Jones [timber clearing contractor] and Harlon Engelbritsen [surveyor]. I’ve called Abilene. Dr. Scott was not in. I left a message to send money. I sent a copy of these 15% contracts to Dr. Scott’s office. A copy is in the envelope marked test holes, road, etc. Harlon could use the full amount as of today June 14. Bill Jones is due the full amount.


“Paul Roderick [prospective road contractor] has prepared a new bid including using the material [gravel] available on the property. Its in the envelope. I just received it a few days ago. I have not sent a copy to Dr. Scott. The bid does not specifically include existing road maintenance. I tried to contact Paul today but could not. You may want to contact him. The best way is at his home at night. I’ve talked with both Dan Drake and John Hanson [possible road contractors]. John Hanson was not interested in a new bid.


“I have sent tower information to South Central Comm. Also I have contacted Newberry Alaska, however Mr. Jim Edelen was not in. He was the person I made contact with in February [about tower erection contract]. Please call him at 349-6631 to see if they are still interested. Tower information is in the envelope.


“I will see you Sunday I hope, and I can explain the skidding problem further.


“I still have not received the soils information yet.


“See you soon, Kevin.”

____________________________________________


F. M.’s first step in getting things started in Anchor Point was to get an office with a fully functional telephone, local and long distance. He and Charlotte were living in their Airstream Trailer which had no work space at all. The local Anchor Point Church of Christ gave to F. M. the use of a small basement room in the church building and some furniture to serve as an office. F. M. immediately had a telephone installed. But this was to serve only temporarily. It would be desirable to transfer the office to the radio station site as soon as an access road to the site was available. So early application was made for telephone service at the radio station site. When the road access was ready, F. M. wanted the telephone service to be ready (even if he had to use it in a tent).


The first reply from the local telephone company was very disappointing, indicating months of delay in laying several miles of underground wire to the WCBC site. The story was that the machines for digging the underground trench were in short supply and the WCBC request was not high enough on the priority list to get immediate service. It would be several months before service at the station site could be arranged. F. M. went back to them saying that our schedule could not stand that kind of delay, so please provide some kind of temporary service immediately, like just laying a wire on top of the forest floor as they do in the military. If necessary, F. M. suggested, they might provide a radio phone connected into the system. F. M. pointed out that they were the communication people and WCBC was the customer and now was the time to come through with what was needed. F. M. pointed out that the station was scheduled to go on-the-air before they were indicating ability to provide a telephone line. [Apparently the request was taken seriously for the telephone line was completed by the time the road access was complete!]


The following letter from Bob Scott arrived in late June shortly after F. M. arrived:


“Mr. F. M. Perry

c/o Norman Lowell

Box 167

Anchor Point, AK 99556

June 17, 1982


“Dear F. M.,


“Enclosed are the original documents concerning transactions we have had with possible volunteers and/or employees since you left. Once you've had a chance to evaluate these, I will welcome your counsel on how we should follow up with each of them.


“I trust that your trip to Anchor Point was without difficulty and that you are making progress toward getting settled. If all goes as we hope it will, it shall be my purpose to fly to Anchorage on July 9. As soon as my plans can be firmed up in a more definite way, I shall be in touch with you about that date.


“I'm truly thankful that God has blessed our efforts to the point that we are now moving to construct the station for which we have planned so long. It is an enormous comfort to me to know that you will be guiding the building of that station. I'm firmly convinced God has prepared you for this role in His kingdom at this time.


“With Christian affection,


“Robert E. Scott.”

 __________________________________________


The next day a copy of the following letter arrived getting the work started on installation of electrical power by Homer Electric Assn.:


“Mr. S.C. Matthews

Manager, Engineering Serivces

Homer Electric Association, Inc.

Box 429

Homer, AK 99603

June 18, 1982


“Dear Mr. Matthews,


“Thank you for the assistance you and your staff have provided as we worked to complete our plans to build an international short wave radio station near Anchor Point. I appreciate your having sent us the Application for Service forms.


“As you were informed during the visit Mr. F.M. Perry, our Director of Engineering, had with you the FCC granted our construction permit. We are now waiting until final procedures are accomplished prior to making a public announcement of our plans for construction. That should come in early July.


“I understood from Mr. Perry in a conversation by phone today that you would be able to proceed with engineering on our service if we would submit the necessary papers and fees, even though we might need to put a temporary hold on the completion of the project in the event there were an unforseen delay. We are confident the project will go to completion. Hence, we do not consider it a risk to pay the required fees and ask you to proceed with the engineering on our service to be installed.


“Please find enclosed in triplicate our signed Application for Service, a Page 2 with amplification of points 7 and 8 on the application, a power distribution diagram for transmitter/studio building, a tentative plot plan for building and mobile homes, and a tentative plot plan for the entire site. I am also enclosing our check in the amount of $8,725 for the required Fees and Deposit for this application.


“Thank you for giving this matter your prompt attention. I look forward to meeting. you soon on my next visit to the Kenai Peninsula.


“Sincerely,


“Robert E. Scott, EdD

President

Enclosures.”

________________________________________


Truck for WCBC Project Purchased In Anchorage.


Bob Scott had made arrangements for WCBC Board member, Pat McMahon, to acquire a pick-up truck for use by the workers at the Anchor Point site. The following letter explains:


“Mr. Pat McMahan

Box 314

Anchorage, AK 99510



June 17, 1982


“Dear Pat,


“Thanks for your phone call this afternoon. I appreciate your having purchased the 1981 Chevy 3/4 ton V-8 for us. As I understood the transaction, the purchase price was $9,000. Of that amount, I understood you had personally paid $1,000 as a down payment. Thus, at your direction, I have obtained Cashier's Check No. 3193 in the amount of $8,000 from Interfirst Bank of Abilene, made out to Sykes Hamilton from whom the purchase was made. I am also enclosing a check from WCBC in the amount of $1,000 to you as reimbursement for your having made this down payment on our behalf.


“Sincerely,

Robert E. Scott

Enclosures.”

__________________________________________


Another letter from Bob Scott illustrates further progress made during the month of June, the month of F. M.’s arrival in Alaska:


“Mr. F.M. Perry

Box 453

Anchor Point AK 99556

June 18, 1982


“Dear F.M.


“It was good to have heard from you again today. I appreciate the information you share about your visit with Mr. Matthews at HEA.


“As you suggested I have completed the HEA Application for Service. I enclosed the four additional pages you 1eft along with the check in the amount of $8,725. A copy of my letter to Mr. Matthews is also enclosed.


“In this letter you will also find the three applications we got today. They were from John Dahlstrom, Kevin Potter, and Lawrence McCollum. Kevin looks like a possibility for production studio work in the lower 48 but either or both of the other two may be possibilities for the construction phase.


“We completed purchase of the pick-up Pat McMahan was checking out. He bought the 1981 Chevy 3/4 ton V-8. I've already completed payment. We'll have some insurance on it when you pick it up on Tuesday.


“Keep in touch as needed.


“Brotherly,

Robert E. Scott

Enclosures.”

_____________________________________________


The following letter to Bill Ashley sets the stage for final specifications on the transmitter/studio building:


“Mr. Bill Ashley

5645 Mount Burnside Way

Burke, Virginia 22015


“Dear Bill,


“I missed you during my short stay at home in Virginia. I’m settled down in Anchor Point, temporarily in a trailer which I pulled 4600 miles to Alaska. We hope to have more spacious quarters soon.


“Construction will start in earnest on July 12. I saw our architect, Dick Perkins, a couple of days ago in Anchorage. Here is a copy of the latest floor plan revised according to your sketch made in Dallas.


“Harris Inc. Has told us that the transmitter has a noise level of 85 db and the studios should have sound insulation of 50 db or more (these figures were passed to me second hand and I’m not sure I understand them.) Anyway, I conclude we are going to have to take special pains to ‘decouple’ the noise from the transmitters toward the studios. Do you have any suggestions concerning doors for the studios?


“Please mail the equipment list, the transmitter book, and your sketches of the studios to me at the Anchor Point post office box above [P. O. Box 473, Anchor Point, AK 99556 assigned]. We are really making some progress now. Hope to hear from you soon.


“F. M. Perry.”


July 1982 -


The following letter from Bob Scott brought F. M. into World Christian Broadcasting as a full fledged “employee.” Although he had been named as Director of Engineering several months before, he was, up to this time, an "Advisor" receiving remuneration only for his expenses. Note that Kevin Chambers became an "employee" at the same time. (Actually, Bob Scott and his small office staff in Abilene were the only "employees" up to this time. The Board of Directors had been reluctant to establish an ongoing payroll of employees before the granting of a Construction Permit by the FCC.)


"Mr. F.M. Perry

Box 453

Anchor Point, AK 99556

July 1, 1982


"Dear F.M.,


"It was good to have talked with you last evening. I apologize for the lateness in sending your check for June. It was my understanding that you wanted me to begin treating you as an employee, rather than as a consultant, with this check. Thus, I have deducted both FICA (Social Security at 6.7%) and (FIT) or Federal Income Tax with two dependents. Of course, you will need to complete a w-4 to declare your number of dependents, which I shall bring with me next week.


"Please welcome Kevin Chambers aboard for us. I'll arrange for him to be paid on the 1st and 15th of each month while I'm in Alaska next week.


"Larry Blosser of Zaragoza's firm called this afternoon. He had talked with Mr. Breig. As yet, there have been no responses to our CP (Construction Permit). He is to call me again on July 9, just before I depart.


"I'm looking forward to being with you. Much hard work lies ahead, but I believe God will empower us to meet every challenge, as we daily put our trust in Him.


"It's an honor to work with you in this task.


"Brotherly,

Robert E. Scott

Enclosures

P.S. I'm also enclosing the letter from Donna Henderson."

________________________________________________


F. M. reported the construction progress to Bob Scott by telephone sometimes daily and at least once a week. Not as many letters were exchanged between F. M. and Bob as in earlier work in the lower 48.


As with any actual construction job, it was found necessary to make changes in the planned specifications for the layout of antennas on the WCBC property. These changes are explained in the following letter:


                                                                                                "Please reply to:

                                                                                                P. O. Box 473

                                                                                                Anchor Point, Alaska 99556

                                                                                                July 21, 1982

"Dr. Robert E. Scott

World Christian Broadcasting Corporation July 21,1982

P. O. Box 3857

Abilene, Texas 79604


"Dear Bob:


"As you know, we are making some last minute changes in our station site layout. These changes are for the purpose of making better use of our property and reducing installation costs. In my opinion these changes are of such nature that they do not require prior approval by the FCC. However, we should bring them to the attention of Mr. Charles Brieg at the FCC for his information. Perhaps our attorney, Mr. Richard Zaragoza, would contact Mr. Brieg for us. The changes are described below and in the attached site plans.


"SITE PLAN #l is the site plan presented with our FCC application and is the plan approved by the FCC. In this plan the most northerly tower for the TCI Model 611 antenna was to be placed 400 feet south of the northern border of our property. The two towers for the TCI Model 516-3 antenna were also to be placed 400 feet south of the northern border of the property.


"As we prepared to install the antennas at these locations it was found that the most northerly tower foundation and some of the guy anchors for the Model 611 antenna were in a muskeg (swampy) area where adequate foundations would be very expensive to install. For this primary reason we decided to move the Model 611 antenna to the south a distance of 159 feet. On SITE PLAN #2 the most northerly tower of the Model 6ll antenna is now 550 feet south of the northern

property border.


"Our tentative plans for future years use of our site call for replacement of the Model 516-3 antenna with a higher gain antenna similar to the Model 611. In fact, we will be erecting a tower for the presently approved Model 611 antenna (bore sighted at 300 degrees) that will support another Model 611 antenna {bore sighted at 0 degrees) to facilitate erection should we eventually request and receive FCC approval for it.


"With this future possibility in mind we noted that the presently approved Model 516-3 log-periodic antenna, placed in accordance with SITE PLAN #1, would have to be completely dismantled in order to erect the new antenna. We think it best to move the Model 516-3 antenna site now so that after erection it can remain in operation during erection of a new Model 611 antenna and no on-the-air time will be lost during the changeover of antennas. This is the reason for the change in location of the Model 516-3 antenna to the site shown on SITE PLAN #2.


"Note that these changes have increased the distances from the actual antenna radiating elements to our property borders where the protective fence will be located. The power density of RF radiation at the fence line in front of our antennas will be less with SITE PLAN #2 than with the original SITE PLAN #1.


"We are proceeding with preparations to install our two approved antenna structures in accordance with SITE PLAN #2.


"We are happy to report that the clearing of timber and construction of our access road is underway and that preparations for construction of antennas and transmitter building is on schedule.


"Sincerely yours,


"Francis M. Perry

Director of Engineering

Attachments:

SITE PLAN #1

SITE PLAN #2"

_____________________________________________


A number of impediments to construction progress were cleared up during the month of July 1982.


First, the problems concerning the obtaining of easements to run the HEA electrical power line across private and state owned properties were solved. HEA was then able to proceed with laying the power line over the shortest and most economical route to WCBC property.


Second, the WCBC application to the State of Alaska to lease state owned land to the north of WCBC property, which had appeared to present a schedule problem (since the state required six months or more to act on a lease), was dropped altogether. The FCC had accepted the latest WCBC plot plan for antenna placement as being adequate for public safety without the need for additional (state owned) land. Also, it became clear that the route for construction of the new road would be entirely on private property and state land would not be needed for road access.


Third, the possible problem of WCBC’s new road becoming a right of way for the public to the thousands of acres of undeveloped land beyond WCBC property was solved by formation of an exclusive home owner’s association. All the present owners of homes to the south of WCBC property, who had been using the track road across WCBC property to gain access to their homes, were legally joined together into a road maintenance association to be allowed to use and contribute to the maintenance of the new road after it was built. The new WCBC constructed road became essentially a private road for the exclusive use of certain already established homeowners.


The accomplishment of these three things were reported in the following letters:


“July 26,1982


“Dear Bob:


“I'm using the new typewriter donated to us by the Anchorage church. Perhaps I'll learn how to use it soon. We also received a new file cabinet for which I am sending a check to Pat McMahon.


“John Dahlstrom arrived right on schedule. He is working with Kevin Chambers today doing some more surveying for timber removal. I believe he will be a big help to us.


“I will have contacted you by phone by the time you receive this. Just in case I haven't reached you, Jim Evans has gotten the State's OK to keep the power line in its present position (10 feet from the Section line) instead of moving it over to a position 33 feet from the Section line. This should satisfy Mrs. Lowe and her attorney. I will be sending the check for $500 to her, or to her attorney, as you direct. Tim Evans must send them a new easement to sign. I will need the phone number and address and name of Mrs Lowe's attorney. Should Tim Evans send the new easement to her attorney? Rick Baldwin suggested we go ahead and arrange things with Mrs. Lowe without his ‘getting into the act.’


“Rick suggested we go ahead and cancel our request to the State of Alaska for right-of-way across the state owned muskeg. I will be doing that by letter. Rick said that he has already notified the State about the change in plans concerning use of state land to the north. He has not yet dropped our request (for lease because the waiting period concerning the Borough Planning Commission's latest action has not expired. After that he said we should drop our request for lease unless we have a specific immediate use for the land. He said the state will not lease land for possible future use.


“Spenard Builders Supply in Anchorage notified me that our credit limit at Homer is $1000. To increase that we will have to get National Bank of Alaska to send a letter to them stating the balance in our bank account. I plan to ask NBA to do that.


“Mr. Seville was at his property this week end and Norman Smith contacted him concerning the road association. Mr Neville sail that he was in agreement with the purposes of the road association but he would not sign to be a member at present because of certain wording in the ‘Articles of Incorporation.’ Article II, para (a) states a purpose of the Corporation ‘to construct’ a road. Article II, para (c) states a purpose of the Corporation to ‘fix, levy, collect and enforce payment’ for charges or assessments. Mr. Neville is afraid he will get a bill for his part of the present roa1 construction. Norman assured him that he would not get a bill for the present road construction and Mr. Neville said he believed Norman. However, both he and Norman are wondering if that wording in the Articles should not be changed so that it is clear that members of the association will not be billed for the construction of the road we are now building.


“I'll be talking to you by phone. Things are progressing smoothly.


“Sincerely,

F. M.”

______________________________________

  

“July 26,1982


“Mr C R Baldwin

Attorney at Law

P. O. Box 4210

Kenai, Alaska 99611


“Dear Rick:


“Enclosed are the two signed copies of the Articles of Incorporation of the Anchor Point Road Maintenance Association, Inc.


“For your information, in contacting one of the potential members of the road association, Mr. Seville, he refused to sign up as a member for the following reason:


“Article II, para (a) of the Articles of Incorporation states a purpose ‘to construct’ a road. Article II, para (c) states a purpose ‘to fix, levy, collect and enforce payment by lawful means, all charges or assessments.’ Mr. Seville is afraid that he will get a bill for a portion of the cost of the new road WCBC is building. He said that he was in agreement with all the other purposes of the association and would sign as a member if it was made clear that he will not be assessed a portion of the cost of new road construction. He is willing to be assessed a portion of the maintenance costs after the road is completed.


“I have mentioned this objection to Bob Scott, or will be mentioning it when I talk to him on the telephone today.


“Best wishes,


“Francis M Perry.”

_________________________________________


“26 July 1982


“Mr Barry W Jackson

Attorney at Law

Box 348

Fairbanks, Alaska 99706


“Dear Mr. Jackson:


“I understand that Dr. Robert E. Scott, President of World Christian Broadcasting Corporation, contacted you some days ago concerning an easement across the land of Mrs. Bertha Lowe to construct an electrical power line to feed power to our property. Dr Scott indicated to me that Mrs. Lowe was willing to grant the easement if the new power line will be constructed on the same line across her property that the present power line now occupies. I have discussed this with Mr. Tim Evans of Homer Electric Association, Inc. and he assures me that this condition will be met, that is, that the new power line will be erected on the same line now occupied by the present power line which is 10 feet inside and parallel to the Section line.


“By the time you receive this Mr. Tim Evans will probably have called you and talked to you about this matter. He will need to send a new document for Mrs. Lowe to sign granting the easement.


“I trust that we have met all the requirements that Mrs. Lowe has stipulated. Therefore, I am enclosing our check for $500.00 in payment for this easement. Please return the signed easement to Mr Tim Evans of Homer Electric Association, Inc. as soon as possible.


“Sincerely yours,


“Francis M Perry

Director of Engineering.”

__________________________________________



“27 July 1982


“Mr. John Wharam

South Central District Office

Department of Natural Resources

941 East Dowling Road

Anchorage, Alaska 99502


“Dear Mr. Wharam:


“On March 2, 1982 we submitted to your office our application for a Right-of- Way Permit to build an access road to our property. We indicated in our application that our construction schedule required the road construction to start in May 1982. However, since the submission of our application we have had no direct correspondence with you. At this late date it becomes absolutely necessary for us to move ahead with construction of an all weather access road to our property. Since we do not have the necessary permit to cross state land with the road, we have made arrangements and are proceeding to construct the road entirely on private lands following the path of an already existing road (see attached sketch). This route avoids the so-called ‘wetlands’ altogether.


“Please cancel our application of 2 March 1982.


“Sincerely yours,


“Francis M Perry

Director of Engineering.”

___________________________________________


A volunteer workman, Mr. John Dahlstrom, a young man of college age from Massachusetts, arrived about July 25, 1982. His room and board was contracted with Bud and Harriet Kinder who have opened a dormitory and are providing meals for volunteer men who come to assist in the construction work. Other volunteers are reported to be on their way to Anchor Point. Also F. M. was pleased to receive as a gift to WCBC an electric typewriter from the Church of Christ in Anchorage.

               


“July 27, 1982


“Mr. John Dahlstrom

c/o F. M. Perry

Box 473

Anchor Point, AK 99556


“Dear John,


“Welcome to our project in Alaska. We're truly grateful for your interest in helping to build the radio station at Anchor Point.


“There is much work to be done there. You are working with some of God's finest servants. I am confident you will enjoy the opportunity to be with people like F. M. Perry and Kevin Chambers, as well as the fine people in the church at Anchor Point.


“We're truly grateful for your interest in this project. The fact that you were able to pay your own transportation expenses is doubly appreciated.


“While you are there, we will be providing you room and board plus a modest salary of $100 a week. That will be paid to you by check through the office there under the direction of F. M. Perry. It will be necessary for us to withhold income tax and social security from that payment. Although this is much less than you could be making if you were employed in industry, we are genuinely grateful for your willingness to have a part in this very important project.


“May your time in Alaska be a blessing to you and to others as you help us prepare this station over which many people shall be able to hear the gospel of Christ.


“Sincerely,


“Robert E. Scott

bcc: F. M. Perry.”

_________________________________________


“July 26,1982


“Mr Pat C. McMahon

c/o Anchorage Church of Christ

2700 DeBarr Road

Anchorage, Alaska 99510


“Dear Pat:


“Thank you so much for the typewriter (thank the congregation). I'm learning to use it and I will have a secretary to use it later. Also, thank you for purchasing the file cabinet for us. Our WCBC check for $159.99 to reimburse you is enclosed.


“John Dahlstrom arrived and is working at site with Kevin Chambers today. I think he will be a big help to us .


“Best Wishes,


“F. M. Perry

World Christian Broadcasting Corporation.”

_________________________________________________


Start of Access Road Construction:


A major order of business when F. M. arrived at Anchor Point was to get the road built to the site. His first impulse was to negotiate with Norman Lowell Smith to use the first segment of his road up the hill and then to branch off from Smith’s road immediately at the top of the hill with a new road aimed directly across the muskeg towards the southwest corner of the radio station site. Then the road would go up the wooded southern boundary of the station site about a quarter mile to the spot that had been picked for construction of the station transmitter building. This was the shortest road distance and would entail about 1/2 mile of new road construction. The first portion of the new road across a muskeg area was through private property requiring that we get an easement to build a road across it. Mr. Smith had already given permission for use of his road up the hill to a certain point where the new road could take off on the direct route to the WCBC property.


In Alaska, with respect to construction projects on “muskeg” land, F. M. was soon to learn that he had more things to consider than just picking the shortest distance over which to build the road. In building in “muskeg” areas laws concerning the preservation of “wet lands” come into play. F. M. was soon to learn that he had to get the approval of the U. S. Engineer Department (U. S. Corps of Engineers) before starting to build a road over “muskeg” areas. Through telephone inquiry he learned that before starting to build, he would have to make application with full map and construction details to the Corps of Engineers. The Corps of Engineers indicated by phone that the necessary approval could not be given without a comprehensive study of the route which would require six months or more for them to complete. It was possible that a road at that location would not be permitted because of restrictions concerning the protection of “wetlands.”


F. M. decided that he must personally investigate the road building project with someone in authority at the U. S. Engineer Office in Anchorage (an office for which he had worked 40 years earlier during World War II.) F. M. knew that a 6 month’s to 1 year’s delay in having road access to the radio station site could not be tolerated.. So he immediately drove up to Anchorage and got in to see the highest official who would accept his visit. He was received very graciously as a fellow engineer. F. M. explained the project which he was trying to get started and the importance of meeting the schedule which called, first of all, for an access road. In cabinets in the Corps of Engineers’ office were aerial photographic maps of the WCBC station site and the very route where it was proposed that the road be built. Pulling out the proper map the official pointed out to F. M. how the aerial photograph showed that parts of the area were very much like “wet lands” and, therefore, probably not available by law for any kind of development. The final verdict was that he could not be sure, but that WCBC could only make application and wait until his professional staff could make a final determination.

  

F. M. was not about to let the project undergo a long delay just as it was getting started, so he simply asked the official if he might proceed to build the road across portions of the land by taking a route avoiding the spots likely to be considered to be “wet lands.” He said the Corps of Engineers would not be involved at all if WCBC built on land not deemed to be “wet lands.” F. M. then had him point out the spots on the land in question which might be deemed to be “wet lands.” These spots were all near the beginning of the proposed road route where it was to “take off” from Smith’s road. F. M. determined that the access road had to avoid these spots so that application would not have to be made to the Corps of Engineers. F. M. mentioned this strategy to the official. He said that, under the circumstances, he thought it to be an acceptable way to proceed. If we did not disturb the wet spots visible on the aerial photographs, the Corps of Engineers would not be concerned or involved.


F. M. then had to go back to Anchor Point and negotiate a new route for the access road across the original homestead of Norman Lowell Smith, a route avoiding any semblance of “wet land.” F. M. thanks God for the Christian man Norman Lowell Smith. When F. M. explained the reason he was back looking for a more advantageous route for the road, Norman Lowell Smith was fully in agreement and granted to WCBC the right to build the road across his homestead. The access road was to follow Norman’s road almost to his studio, but then to take off with a new road to the north skirting the muskeg and staying near the edge of the forest until the it reached the southwest corner of the WCBC property. At that point the road would turn right and continue to the transmitter building site as originally planned. A potential schedule catastrophe had been headed off.


The road building contract was awarded to Paul Roderick and he started to work almost immediately. A Right-of-Way Permit for a road had already been submitted to the State of Alaska, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Lands, with specifications for the road as follows:

 

“Trees to be cleared to a width of 50 feet. One lane all season road to be constructed. Muskeg area to be elevated as needed. Ditches to be established each side of right-of-way. Layer of soil stabilization fabric (Typar) 15.5 feet wide to be laid on built up roadway and covered with an average of 1.5 cubic yards of gravel per linear foot of roadway. Right-of-way required to enable widening of roadway to two lanes in future.”


Work Accomplished at Site While Awaiting Completion of Road:


For several weeks before completion of the access road, the only access to WCBC property was by driving to Norman Smith’s Studio, parking there, and walking the rest of the way (about ½ mile). It was decided that this time of poor access be used to prepare the old abandoned cabin for occupancy. First a bull dozer was used to move the cabin to a more advantageous site near where the transmitter building would be located. This was accomplished by jacking up the building and putting logs under it so that it could be dragged with the logs acting as skids. Then, by means of a pickup truck driving in over the old track road, lumber and building materials were brought in and remodeling of the cabin was done. Some materials, like window glass, were carried in on the shoulders of workmen who hiked from Norman’s studio. By the time the road was finished the cabin was almost ready to receive occupants. It had one main room for a dining and sitting area with a small kitchen in one corner and a bathroom with shower in another corner. A loft was provided with a ladder for sleeping. It was a regular little efficiency apartment. Water, sewer, and electrical connections were completed before the end of summer.


John Dahlstrom, a young volunteer from Massachusetts, was very helpful in remodeling the cabin. He returned to his home in Massachusetts after being on the job for two weeks.


Major Redesign of Tower Foundations and Guy Line Anchors Required:


During the month of July F. M. advertised for bids on the construction of tower foundations and guy anchors on the antenna field. In a discussion with a possible contractor F. M. became aware of a budgetary problem he had not foreseen. It led to a major redesign of the tower foundations and guy anchors in order to reduce their cost.


A possible contractor in Palmer, Alaska, Mr. John Lee of New Horizons Construction Company, heard about the request for bids and called F. M. on the phone to make a date to view the job site. Mr. Lee flew in his own airplane from Palmer to Homer and F. M. met him at the Homer airport to escort him to the WCBC property. F. M. told Mr. Lee about WCBC, its method of raising funds, and the reason for a limited budget. He viewed the site, collected copies of the plans and specifications, and went back to Palmer promising to prepare a bid. A few hours later Mr.Lee called F. M. to tell him that he had started to prepare a bid and was already at a cost of $400,000.00 and he wasn’t yet finished. He knew that the cost of the concrete alone, poured in place on the antenna field, would exceed the cost of the towers and antenna themselves. He wondered if F.M. realized the possible magnitude of the cost in preparing the budget. Although F. M. knew that concrete would cost approximately $300 per cubic yard when poured in place on the antenna field, he had not realized how many cubic yards were involved overall and had not provided a budgetary figure nearly high enough.


F. M. decided that it was time to pause in the gathering of bids and reconsider the plans and specifications for the purpose of cost reduction. F. M. thought that a major cost increase at this stage of the project would be almost catastrophic. F. M. thanked Mr. Lee for his advice and asked him to hold up on his bid for a possible change in specifications.


F. M. first called his friend Owen Thompson at TCI, the firm which had produced the plans and specifications. TCI decided to send one of their field engineers to Anchor Point to see what could be done to change specifications and reduce costs. F. M. informed the soils engineer Mike Tauriainen, the architect Richard Perkins, and John Lee, the contractor from Palmer, to arrange a meeting with the TCI field engineer when he arrived.


August 1982 -

 

The field engineer from TCI, Mr. Mansour Moussavian arrived at Anchor Point on August 2. The following letter gives a report on his visit and meeting with the concerned individuals:


“Please reply to

P. O. Box 473

Anchor Point, Alaska 99556

August 3, 1982


“Mr Owen Thompson

Technology for Communicatiion International

1625 Stierlin Road

Mountain View, California 94043


“Dear Owen:


“Mansour Maussavian's trip to Anchor Point was quite successful. We met Mansour at the Kenai airport on Monday, August 2 just after noon. We then had a meeting at the office of our soils engineer, Mike Tauriainen, in Soldatna, Alaska. Also present at the meeting were myself and Kevin Chambers of WCBC, Richard Perkins our architect, and John Lee of New Horizons Construction Company. After the meeting we took Mansour down to Anchor Point and walked across our site. Mansour left the next morning from the Kenai airport.


“As you know, our objective was to explore ways to reduce the cost of antenna foundation installations on our site for the Model 611 and the Model 516 antennas with their associated slewing switch and transmission lines. The original design which TCI provided, when cost estimates were made, proved to be very costly to install. There were large amounts of non-frost-susceptible (nfs) material, large amounts of insulation, and large amounts of concrete, which, when delivered and installed on our difficult site location, would have cost a total of more than $400,000. We found during the meeting that some of the nfs back-fill material and insulation could be deleted from the guy anchor foundations and that the application of insulation to the other foundations could be simplified. However, even with these reductions, the foundations still appeared to be very costly.


“I asked everyone at the meeting to explore less costly alternatives to the use of concrete wherever possible. The possible alternatives suggested were steel pilings for tower base foundations, some sort of steel shapes to be buried in place of concrete guy anchors, and wood poles for transmission lines.


“It was suggested that the material cost of steel pilings might be just as high as that of poured concrete foundations for the tower bases. However, the delivery and installation of pilings might be less expensive than the delivery and installation of concrete. In addition, pilings would not require insulation and nfs material. The steel guy anchors might be prefabricated on or near the site and could be installed possibly without the use of insulation or nfs material. The wood poles, if adequate for transmission lines, could be most economically installed. Even if it were required that each wood pole be guyed, wood poles would still be less costly than steel poles on concrete foundation.


“You see, concrete delivered to the edge of the site will cost about $125 per yard. The final delivery of the concrete to each foundation hole will cost possibly another $125 per yard.


“In our discussions with Mansour, we learned that certain provisions were made in the design which he considered unnecessary but which he included because they were called for in the EIA specification RS-222-C dated March 1976. For instance, Mansour called for "toes" on all the concrete guy anchors which have ‘uplift’ forces on them. Both Monsour and Mike Tauriainen thought that the ‘toes’ were unnecessary. However, Mansour said that the EIA specification RS-222-C (which we placed on TCI through our Dipole Curtain Antenna spec of 5 March 1982) calls for ‘toes.’ In my reading of EIA spec -RS-222-C I see a paragraph where ‘toes’ are mentioned but I do not understand the spec to make them mandatory. In any case, if Mansour and Mike consider them unnecessary, I hereby waive any possible requirement for them since they cost a considerable amount of extra money to construct.


“Similarly, any other provision called for in our specification which Mansour and Mike consider unnecessary, I hereby waive in the interest of cost savings. I would like to be informed, however, of any other such instances.


“In order to make final decisions on these things we need additional soils information from the site. Mike Tauriainen's organization will be making additional soils tests on site during this week and next. Then he will provide us with his recommendations. The design of new foundations should be able to proceed sometime during the week of August 16 by means of the passing of necessary information by telephone between Mr. Mike Tauriainen and Mr. Mansour Moussavian.


“I am making no prior conclusions at this time regarding the type of foundation we finally will install. However, speculating that the final design will still call for some concrete, we must get it poured during September to avoid severe weather. After receipt of the new drawings from TCI, we must solicit quotations from contractors and award a contract in time to get the work done before the end of September. This means that we must have the new foundation drawings in-hand here in Anchor Point no later than August 30, 1982.


“We must admit that the first foundation designs provided by TCI have turned into a ‘dry run’ because of the lack of experience of all concerned with the Anchor Point environment. The ground frost conditions are not nearly as bad as we anticipated. Material and installation costs are much higher than we anticipated.


“We appreciate TCI’s cooperation in this trying situation. We look forward to a long future relationship with you as we expand the Anchor Point station and build additional stations in other parts of the world.


“Sincerely,


“Francis M. Perry

Director of Engineering


“Copies to:

Dr. Robert Scott

Mr. Mooravian

Mr. Tauriainen

Mr. Hunziker, Harris Corp.”

_________________________________________________


The following letter to Bill Ashley summarizes the progress made on the Anchor Point project up to August 30, 1982:


“Please reply to:

P O Box 473

Anchor Point, Alaska 99556

30 August 1982


“Mr Bill Ashley

5645 Mount Burnside Way

Burke, Virginia 22015


“Dear Bill,


“The Board of Directors of WCBC gave us a full go-ahead to construct the station on July 12. We have had our hands full ever since, we placed several contracts that first week: for road construction, timber cutting, timber skidding, and electric power. At this time we have an all season all weather road about 70% of the way in to our building site. The road should be ready

for limited traffic over its entire length within a week. All the timber is cut although skidding and stacking of the logs continues. The power line right-of-way is now cleared and staked. We have also moved an existing cabin shell and have converted it into first class living quarters for a family or for visiting VIPs. I have found rental housing for my wife and me within 6 miles of the station site. We have two permanent employees and nine temporary employees doing jobs like directing traffic over the new road, cutting timber, surveying, carpentering, electric wiring, plumbing, etc.


“We will place a contract for antenna tower foundations within three weeks. Design of the tower foundations has been a problem that has consumed more than six weeks of time. We had one design complete but found it to cost about five times what we had budgeted. We are now redesigning to get the cost down to only two or three times what we had budgeted! We are learning a lot about the cost of doing business in Alaska! (Concrete for foundations costs $131.50

per cubic yard and another $100 a yard to get it delivered out on the muskeg where our foundations have to be.)


“We expect to pour footings for our transmitter building within two weeks. After that we will bring a crew of carpenters to the site to get the building enclosed by the end of September, I hope. We will be constructing the studios and other interior features during late fall and early winter. We expect to install all electronic equipment during the fall and winter.


“Bill, I want to get studio and control equipment on order right away but I don't have your recommended list of equipment. It has been such a long time since I have heard from you I am wondering if your new expanded duties for your employer are going to preclude you from carrying through with the assistance we need from you. If you will not have time to provide the help we need, please let me know right away and I will look for another advisor. I do hope you will be able to squeeze in time for us, however, for I like your ideas and clear-complete instructions (such as the info you provided for our primary AC power distribution room).


“We have had to re-design details at the transmitter end of the building several times as Harris as made changes in the heat exchanger system for the transmitter. It has the same general floor plan, however, as the last one, a copy of which I sent to you. The entire building will have a crawl space under the floor so wiring among equipment will be facilitated. I’ll send you some drawings as soon as the latest design comes out of the blueprint machine.


“You can contact me by telephone at 907-235-8262 (office I when I am there), or 907-235-7289 (home after 6 PM Anchor Point time). There is a 5 hour difference in time between our locations. A call from you at 12 midnight will get me at home at 7 PM. Hope to hear from you soon


“Sincerely,

    

“Francis M. Perry

Director of Engineering.”

_____________________________________________________


F. M. and Charlotte were blessed to be able to move out of the trailer into a rental house within a few weeks after arriving at Anchor Point, a magnificent two story house with 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, 2 kitchens, and lots of extra space with a large two car garage and workshop, all for $700 per month. It was located just 8 miles from the radio station site. Of course, it was far more house than F. M. And Charlotte needed but it was exactly what was needed to house some of the volunteer workers that were expected to begin to come to Anchor Point to help. So F. M. rented the house to have the spacious facilities during the construction phase. (The house was rented from an Alaska State Trooper, Mr. Michael Dowd, who had been transferred to another part of Alaska. Later he offered to sell the house to F. M. or to WCBC. When F. M. gave up the house it was bought by a medical doctor who had just moved to Anchor Point. The medical doctor became F. M. and Charlotte’s physician during much of the 5 and ½ years they lived in Alaska.)


During the late summer and early autumn of 1982 the house was full to overflowing with “guests.” Mr. Lavoy Hooker, a retired radio engineer, and his wife from Oklahoma; Mr. Nash Huerta, an architect/builder from Arizona; Duncan Fields, a retired builder from Kodiak Island; two college girls, Miss Donna Bowman and Miss Karen Rhiel; Mr. Greg Perry, son of the late Lowell Perry, from Abilene; and others were all guests. All the guests pitched in and helped Charlotte with the cooking and house work. F. M. remembers that when the first snow and ice coated the roads he was still ferrying a suburban load of people to the site each morning. By Christmas time, however, all volunteers were temporarily gone and F. M. And Charlotte had the big house alone to themselves. Later, F. M. gave up the rental house in favor of a three bedroom, two bath trailer home on the radio station site. (More later about housing.)


By the latter part of August the WCBC purchase order for the 100,000 watt Harris Corp. transmitter was solid enough that the Harris Corp. had requested shipping instructions for it. Also, F. M. had become concerned about what call letters the new WCBC station might be assigned. Note the following two letters:


“Please reply to:

P O Box 473

Anchor Point, Alaska 99556

30 August 1982


“Mr. Gary E. Hunziker

Harris Corporation, Broadcast Division

P O. Box 4290

Quincy, Illinois 62305


“Re: Our order, Harris No. 21253


“Dear Mr. Hunziker:


“In our last telephone conversation, you requested a shipping address for our order. It is as follows:


“World Christian Broadcasting Corporation

Mile 160.9, South, Sterling Highway

Anchor Point, Alaska 99556

Directions for truck delivery: At mile 160.9 on the Sterling, Highway (approximately 4 miles south of Anchor Point post office), turn east on road marked ‘Norman Lowell Studio.’ Follow gravel road approximately one mile to World Christian Broadcasting Corporation building.


“We are in the process of building an access road and a new building. By the time any shipment is made we expect to have the road completed and the building completed.


“Before shipment of the transmitter, two people from our organization plan to visit Quincy and get some instruction in the tuning, operation, maintenance, and installation of it. Please let us know your schedule for our visit.


“Most shipping to the Anchor Point area seems to be routed via Anchorage and then by truck to Anchor Point. Shipments of material often reach this area from Seattle within one week.


“We should be notified in advance of the shipment of heavy material which requires special equipment to unload. We will have to make arrangements to have the proper equipment on hand.


“Sincerely,


“Francis M. Perry

Director of Engineering

cc: Dr Robert E. Scott, WCBC, Abilene, Texas.”

__________________________________________________


“P. O. Box 473

Anchor Point, Alaska 99556

30 August 1982


“Dear Bob,


“Could you please check with the FCC and get our ‘final approved’ call letters for the Alaska station. We could be using this in our address. Also I we will be making some security signs that should have our call letters on them.


“I expect the FCC will require a prefix of ‘K.’ In that case I would suggest KWBC for the call letters. If we establish another station in the U. S., say in Tennessee, its call letters could be WCBC.


“More later, F. M.”

__________________________________________________


September 1982 -


WCBC Pickup Truck Destroyed in Accident.


On the morning of September 4, 1982 Mr. Nash Huerta, volunteer worker from Tucson, Arizona, was proceeding in the WCBC owned Chevrolet pickup truck along the Sterling Highway nearing the 160.9 mile point marking the intersection with the access road to the WCBC property. At that same time the access road traffic director, a young woman employee of WCBC, was standing near the intersection conversing by means of citizens band radio with F. M. Perry who was at his home. Nash Huerta started to turn left off of the Sterling Highway onto the WCBC access road, but at that moment he suddenly realized that a vehicle was coming up from behind him very fast attempting to pass him on his left. The passing vehicle was pulling a boat on a trailer. F. M. at his home heard the young woman exclaim in alarm over the radio as she saw the accident happening in front of her eyes. She described the accident to F. M. as it happened. The two vehicles side swiped each other then each vehicle took evasive action. Nash in the pickup truck went into the ditch on the one side of the road and the vehicle with trailer and boat went into the ditch also. It so happened that an Alaska State Trooper drove onto the scene almost immediately after the accident. And F. M. hurried from his home to the scene as quickly as possible. The trooper gave each driver a summons. Nash’s summons read “failure to signal a left turn.” The other driver’s summons read “illegal passing at an intersection.” Both drivers were “shook up” by the accident. Someone took Nash to the hospital in Homer for a check up. Nash was not seriously hurt. The other driver declined to go to the hospital. He appeared to be all right.


The following letter describes the damage to the truck:


“Please reply to

P.O. Box 473

Anchor Point, Alaska 99556

5 October 1982


“Ms. Nita Singleton

Rollins Burdick Hunter of Alaska, Inc.

840 K Street

Anchorage, Alaska 99501


“Re: Insurance claim relative to accident on 9/4/82,

1981 Chevrolet Pickup, S# 1GCEK24LOBF330074


“Dear Ms. Singleton:


“Our wrecked Chevrolet Pickup truck was towed from Anchor Point to Artic Body Shop in Soldotna, Alaska at the direction of an insurance adjuster, Mr. Jim Tibbodeaux of Northern AdJusters, Soldotna. That happened more than a week ago. On or about 28 September Mr. Tibbodeaux called me to tell me that he was going to report the truck as a total loss. We have not heard anything further from anyone.


“Our conservative estimate of the value of the truck before the accident is $9,000. After deducting the $500 deductible, we would expect to receive $8,500 plus expenses we have incurred and are continuing to incur in the use of a replacement truck. We also have a claim to make under the medical payments clause of the insurance policy. I am enclosing a receipt for treatment of our driver, Mr H. L. Huerta, at the South Peninsula Hospital at a cost of $104.60.


“The wrecked truck is a 1981 Chevrolet 3/4 ton rating with 4 wheel drive, automatic transmission, dual gas tanks, steel belted radial tires, Scottsdale accessory package, and less than 30,000 miles (to the best of my memory). It was just like a new truck in looks and performance.


“For 21 working days to date we have used the pick-up truck of Mr. Kevin Chambers in place of our inoperative truck, and we are continuing to use it. I feel that we must pay Mr. Chambers at least $20 per day for the use of his truck, and that the insurance company should include this in the settlement if our policy will allow it.


“We would appreciate anything you can do to effect an early settlement by the insurance company.


“Sincerely,


“Francis M. Perry

Director of Engineering

cc: Dr Robert E. Scott, Abilene.”

__________________________________________________


As the month of September 1982 closed the road construction was nearly finished and the transmitter/studio building was under construction. Mr. Nash Huerta, a volunteer from the church of Christ in Tucson, Arizona, had been working on site for two months. He had constructed staff living quarters and had been foreman of the crew who had brought the transmitter/studio building from the ground to the point of almost being fully enclosed. Nash had to return home to take care of urgent business. F.M. sent out an urgent appeal to friends of WCBC to contribute money towards a travel fund for Nash Huerta to return to Alaska to complete his direction of construction on the building. He was enabled to return to complete the job.


Vehicular traffic over Norman Smith’s road up the hill became quite heavy during August and September. There were many trucks going back and forth bringing gravel for road construction as well as the cars of a large number of workmen locally hired to work on the building. Since the road was narrow and allowed only one way traffic, it became necessary to station a traffic director at each end of the road communicating with each other by hand held citizen’s band radio sets. The applicants for the traffic director’s job were usually young ladies from Anchor Point.


The WCBC road contract with Paul Roderick called for first work to be done to improve Norman Smith’s original road and to reduce the steep grade on the hill. Only this enabled the original road to stand up under the great amount of traffic that became necessary as the WCBC construction project progressed.


The one major problem still seeking solution at the end of September was that of finding a way to construct the foundations and guy wire anchors without going far over budget in the use of expensive concrete. F. M. was convinced that poured concrete foundations would be required at the base of each of the four towers (two large towers for the curtain dipole antenna and two smaller towers for the log periodic antenna). Careful design was required to keep the amount of concrete to a minimum for these foundations. The steel poles with concrete foundations, originally specified to support the overhead transmission lines to the antennas, were changed to simple wooden poles inserted in the ground. This saved some expense but there was not yet a substitute for the massive amount of concrete that would be necessary to form the 76 anchors needed for a total of 76 guy wires.


October 1982 -


F. M. felt that the best hope for a “break through” in reducing the cost of anchoring the guy wires would lie with Mr. Monsour A. Moussavian, the TCI project engineer, and Mr. Mike Tauriainen, the Consulting Engineer in Soldotna, Alaska. F. M. had asked these men to collaborate and come up with advice on the best way to proceed. A week or so went by with no word from either of these men and the problem was a source of worry because time before winter to get to work on the antenna field was getting very short. The tower foundation contract which included the pouring of concrete had been placed with a firm in Kenai, Alaska called KIMCO, Inc. This firm was already at work preparing the four tower foundations which needed to be installed and insulated before the onset of constantly freezing weather.

     

Feeling desperate concerning the lack of an answer on how to deal with the guy anchors, F. M. drove unannounced to the Soldotna office of Mike Tauriainen. He found that the two men, Mike in Alaska and Monsour in California, had been conversing by phone and had indeed come up with an answer to the problem. The solutions was to do away with concrete anchors altogether and use “earth anchors.”


Earth anchors are made of steel and are meant to be “screwed” into the earth by a truck mounted drilling machine. F. M. had seen small earth anchors used to anchor the guys for telephone poles. But he had never seen large ones used for guying such large towers. Mike was experienced in the use of large earth anchors. He had investigated the soil at the WCBC site and felt that it was ideal for the use of earth anchors. (Proper soil was crucial.) He went over each of the 76 anchor positions around the four towers and calculated the size and depth that each earth anchor would have to be placed. It was decided that more than one earth anchor would be needed at a few of the positions in order to withstand the tension. An advantage in using earth anchors lay in the fact that they could be inserted into the ground at any season. In fact, Mike indicated that winter would be the best time to insert them since the big truck used in the operation could most easily be driven on frozen ground.


t the end of the afternoon F. M. left Mike’s Kenai office convinced that earth anchors were the way to go. During October Mike and Monsour produced specifications for earth anchor installations at each of 76 guy positions. The specifications were complicated by the fact that in many cases several guy wires were often anchored at a single location and equalizer plates had to be designed to connect multiple guys to either one or two earth anchors. The following letter gives a brief hint at the amount of work required to produce the specifications.


“TECHNOLOGY FOR COMMUNICATIONS, INTERNATIONAL

1625 Steirlin Road

Mountain View, California 94043

7 October 1982


“Mr. Mike Tauriainen

P. O. Box 937

Soldotna, Alaska 99669


“Dear Mike:



“Enclosed are turnbuckle and shackle dimensional and strength data, which you

requested per our telephone conversation of 5 October. As I mentioned before,

the equalizer plates are made of ASTM A36 steel. Because in the present case

they are not being used in conjunction with the anchor rods they usually come

with, they shall be designed for each special loading.


“I anticipate receiving sketches of earth anchors from you soon. If there are any further questions, do not hesitate to call me.


“Yours truly,


“Mansour A. Moussavian

Project Engineer


“cc: F. M. Perry, WCBC, Alaska (w/o encl.)


“Enclosures.”

__________________________________________________


Mr. Jim Dedrick was the supervisor for Kimco, Inc. of Kenai, Alaska in the construction of tower foundations. He and his team did a good overall job of excavation, placement of non frost suseptiple gravel in the excavations, the placement of concrete, and the final insulation of the foundations. It was not possible to drive the trucks delivering the concrete directly up to each foundation site because of the softness of the ground. In order to pour the concrete into the widely separated excavations, a pipeline had to be used to pump the fresh concrete from a central location where the mixer truck could be parked.


It was found, however, that the Kimco team was lax in performing quality control tests on concrete samples from each load of freshly mixed concrete. F. M. spoke directly to Mr. Dedrick about his failure to perform the specified tests. The following letter was dispatched to the President of Kimco, Inc.:


“Please reply to:

P O Box 473

Anchor Point, Alaska 99556

29 October 1982


“Mr S. Darby Howell, President

KIMCO Inc

POBox 2910

Kenai, Alaska 99611


“Dear Mr. Howell:


“We consider our contract dated 15 September 1982 to be complete except for your submission of concrete quality control testing data. We trust that the test data from the concrete batch samples will be submitted in due time.


“The general specifications called for performance of concrete quality control testing of each concrete batch up to five batches. Your people did not take samples from the first batch. When we realized this we called it to the attention of Mr. Jim Dedrick and he promised to take test samples from remaining batches. However, in checking with Northern Test Lab, we were told that samples from only one batch have been submitted for testing. Please let us know if other batches have been sampled.


“The lack of concrete quality control data could cause serious consequences in that our insurance company, not being able to establish the integrity of the concrete foundations, may charge higher insurance premiums or even refuse to insure our antenna structures. For this reason we ask that your company, as concrete foundation experts, please assist us in the future at no extra cost to certify or otherwise establish the integrity of the concrete in our antenna foundations. In addition, we feel that we should receive monetary consideration at the rate of at least $150 for each batch which should have been sampled and tested but was not.


“Otherwise, we are pleased to enclose herewith our check for $39,243.00 as billed in your invoice #1882 dated October 26, 1982. It has been a pleasure working with Mr. Jim Dedrick and your other employees.


“As you know, we have an oral agreement with your people to complete four more concrete transmission pole foundations at a cost to us of $1,960.00. We understand that work is going forward on these foundations at present. When you bill us for this additional work, we request that you credit us with a sum equal to the cost of the quality control tests which were not performed.


“Sincerely,


“Francis M. Perry

Director of Engineering

cc: Dr. Robert E. Scott, President.”

__________________________________________________


The following letter indicates preparations were being made to ship the antenna towers to WCBC’s Anchor Point site:


"TECHNOLOGY FOR COMMUNICATIONS INTERNATIONAL

1625 Stierlin Road

Mountain View, California 94043

October 21, 1982


"Harris Corporation

Broadcast Products Division

P.O. Box 4290

Quincy, IL. 62301


"Attention: Juanita Berry


"SUBJECT: W.C.B.C. Antennas, Harris P.O. C-92219, TC1 5378


"As you know the WCBC antenna towers are needed at the site as early as possible. We had received a request from Mr. Perry for an updated estimate of the shipping date for the towers so he could plan his scheduling accordingly.


"The towers from Peoria are due to ship at the end of October, and the TC1 towers are now ready to go to the painters. This information was given to Mr. Perry via phone 20 Oct.


"During that phone conversation I requested him to verify the shipping destination for the towers. He wants them shipped to the Mile Post marker address near Anchor Point rather than hold for pick up in Anchorage. You may recall the embedment hardware was held for WCBC pickup in order to reduce the total time required to get the material to the site. However since the towers are much larger and heavier the transportation carrier should deliver to the site and we will instruct them accordingly.


"Mr. Perry is being marked for a copy of letter so that all concerned are aware of what is transpiring.


"Sincerely,


"Owen E. Thompson

Applications Engineer

C.c. F. M. Perry, W.C.B.C."

______________________________________________


Robbery at WCBC Radio Station Job Site.


One morning in October when the workmen reported for work at the WCBC radio station site they found the site strangely barren. The portable gas engine driven electric generator was missing. As they looked around they found that many tools, including a gas engine driven chain saw was also missing. Apparently someone had pulled up to the site with a pickup truck during the night, loaded every loose tool they could quickly find, and driven away with them. At that time only the foundation to the transmitter/studio building had been completed. One of the carpenters had set up alongside the foundation a homemade carpenter’s bench with an electric table saw and gas-engine generator to supply the electricity. The generator also supplied electricity for several electric hand saws. There was no way to easily stow away the larger items at night so we had gotten in the habit of simply covering the larger items with a canvas to keep them dry overnight.


The State police were called and all the missing items were listed with them. We had to immediately get another engine generator to support the carpenters working on site. [We heard nothing from the police for several months. The following spring or summer we were called by the State Police office in Homer to come to the office to possibly identify some of our stolen items from among a number of items they had taken into custody. There we found the long missing gas engine generator and a chain saw that had belonged to F. M. The two items still worked but they were pretty well worn. We never knew for sure who the thieves were.]


November 1982 -


A request for bids on a contract to insert the earth anchors for antenna tower guy lines was issued on November 3, 1982. Mr. Donald E. Millikin, a surveyor had already marked the position and elevation on the antenna field for each earth anchor insertion.


“Please reply to:

P O Box 473

Anchor Point, Alaska 99556

3 November 1982


“To: Prospective Bidders


“Subject: Installation of earth anchors for mooring antenna guys.


“The World Christian Broadcasting Corporation (WCBC) solicits quotations from experienced contractors for installation of earth anchors to resist antenna guy loads. Approximately 97 separate earth anchors are required at 76 separate guy locations on two antenna fields as shown on the attached site plan. In addition to the installation of earth anchors, provision and installation of two wood poles is required.


“The contractor must have the capability to survey-in each anchor point (from reference point stakes placed by WCBC) and to test the earth anchors by proof loading them. The contractor shall provide the earth anchors in accordance with the attached specifications and charts.


“WCBC is presently preparing the sites by removing stumps and grading. A bulldozed track road shall be provided to each area by WCBC. The soil is expected to be frozen to sufficient depth to support contractor equipment.


“WCBC intends to award a contract for this work in the very near future so that work may be started during November 1982. WCBC reserves the right to reject any and all bids.


“Drawings and specifications may be viewed at the WCBC office in the Church of

Christ building, Anchor Point, Alaska, or at the site one mile east of the Sterling Highway at mile 160.9 S (take gravel road marked "Norman Lowell Studio). Bidders should visit the site before preparing their quotations.


“Francis M. Perry

Director of Engineering.”

_______________________________________________


“WORLD CHRISTIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION

P O. Box 473

Anchor Point, Alaska 99556

November 2, 1982


“Specifications for Earth Anchors for WCBC Antenna Systems.


“1. Intent is to install numerous earth anchors (EA) at various locations on WCBC site in Anchor Point, Alaska as shown on attached drawings and charts. EAs are to resist antenna guy loads.


“2. Contractor shall be able to demonstrate previous experience installing EAs.


“3. Anchors may be either contractor fabricated or pre-engineered and factory assembled. Contractor must provide submittals of EA assembly for approval prior to field work.


“4. Contractor may submit alternate schedule of EAs using more or larger EAs subject to Owner approval. Contractor must demonstrate prior successful use of same or similar EAs.


“5. Each EA shall be proof loaded to 100% of design load. If the design load cannot be achieved due to soil failure, notify Owner and Engineer immediately for review of procedures and conditions.


“6. Owner may require contractor to proof load one or more anchors to 2 x design load or to failure. In no case should this 2 x load exceed 40,000#. The first such test should be at no additional cost. Cost for additional tests would be negotiated.


“7. Contractor shall adequately collapse, compact or otherwise assure adequate restoration of soils around each EA as necessary if a hole is actually drilled.


“8. Contractor shall supply suitable equipment to test and measure proof loading.


“9. The EA and associated hardware shall be capable of resisting minimum of 1.5 x design load without deformation or failure of the anchor assembly (not including soils). An end connector such as a ring or eye shall be included as part of the assembly. The EA shall extend at least 5 feet out of the ground unless otherwise indicated.


“10. The EAs shall be installed within + or - 1 foot and + or - 2 degrees tolerance of the location and angle specified in attached drawings and charts. Any greater deviation must be approved by the owner in writing.


“11. Where more than one EA is required at a single location the horizontal separation distance between adjacent EAs shall be between 2.5 feet and 3.5 feet with a separation angle of 10 to 20 degrees. Each group of anchors at a single location shall be centered on the guy point as staked or otherwise indicated in the drawings.


“12. The EAs shall be fully galvanized or completely coated with two coats of zinc chromate paint.


“13. The owner will remove stumps and grade the area around each guy point as shown on attached drawings. A bulldozed track road shall be provided to each area where EAs are to be installed. The soil is expected to be frozen to a depth of 1 or 2 feet.


“14. The owner will identify each guy point with reference stakes so that exact guy points may be located by the contractor by use of surveyor's transit and measuring equipment.


“Francis M. Perry

Director of Engineering

WCBC.”

________________________________________________


The request for prospective bidders to install the earth anchors brought to WCBC attention three bidders. Before awarding a contract, F. M. discussed the contract in the following letter to the WCBC attorney, Mr. C. R. Baldwin:


“Please reply to:

P O Box 473

Anchor Point, Alaska 99556

16 November 1982


“Mr. C. R. Baldwin

Attorney at Law

P.O. Box 4210

Kenai, Alaska 99611


“Dear Rick:


“We will soon be making a contract with a firm for the installation of Earth Anchors for our radio broadcasting antennas. The value of the contract will be about $60,000. There are three proposals expected from the following firms:


“Denali Drilling, Anchorage, Alaska (Mr. Ed Aberle, 279-4568)

Fletcher Excavating, Soldatna, Alaska (Mr. Ike Fletcher, 262-4739)

Pileco, Inc., Anchoracre, Alaska (Mr. Martin Luther, 344-0012)


“Bob Scott has asked that I get your approval of the contract wording. To expedite this, I have typed up an agreement on the AIA Document A40l form similar to the agreement that you helped us word in our contract with KIMCO, Inc. of Kenai. That contract has been successfully completed, incidentally.


“Would you please look over this attached wording, correct or change it as necessary, and send it back to me so that I can have it typed up on a fresh blank AIA form. We'll send it to Bob in Texas for signature as soon as we get a successful bidder.


“Concerning the Article on Progress Payments, we would be agreeable to making progress payments if the Subcontractor should require it. Would this be prudent?


“Have you heard anything, pro or con, about any of these bidders?


“Thank you for your help.


“Sincerely,


“Francis M. Perry

Director of Engineering.”

_______________________________________________________


The contract for installation of earth anchors was awarded to Denali Drilling of Anchorage by means of the following letter:


“Please reply to

P.O. Box 473

Anchor Point, Alaska 99556

27 November 1982


“Mr. Edward Aberle, Superintendent

Denali Drilling, Inc.

6000 A Street

Anchorage, Alaska 99502


“Dear Mr. Aberle:


“Thank you for your proposal of November 12, 1982 in which you offer to install 97 earth anchors and two wood poles for a total price of $59,570.00. The World Christian Broadcasting Corporation desires to accept your offer subject to the terms of a contract to be signed by officials of our two organizations.


“I have taken the liberty to draft a contract on the attached standard AlA Sub-Contract form. Assuming that these terms will be satisfactory to you, and in order to save time, I have mailed a copy to our Abilene, Texas office for signature by our President. If you desire to make changes, deletions, or additions to the contract, please telephone me as soon as possible and I will arrange to make any mutually acceptable changes before signatures are affixed. As soon as you indicate that this contract wording is satisfactory, our President will sign an original copy and send it to you by one of the air express services for you signature.


“I have discussed this contract by telephone with our President, Mr. Robert E. Scott, and have received permission to authorize you to proceed with the purchase of the necessary earth anchor material specified in your proposal.


“Sincerely,


“Francis M. Perry

Director of Engineering

cc: Mr. Robert E. Scott, President.”

__________________________________________________


Ever since F. M.’s first encounter with the short wave frequency spectrum as a teenager (in the 1930's) when he was merely an occasional listener to short wave programming, the frequency bands allotted to short wave broadcasting had always seemed crowded and chaotic. F. M. wondered if there was any effort to organize the bands and allot frequencies to the various countries on an organized basis, concluding that to him as a listener it sounded like there was not. However, this was not the case then and it is not the case now. An organization called the World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC), of which most countries of the world are members, tries to bring order out of chaos. In the present high tech computer era, the WARC is doing a pretty good job of keeping the use of the short wave radio frequency spectrum organized with frequency coordination among the many broadcasters an important part of their effort.


Understanding that the activities of the WARC organization would be important to WCBC’s broadcasting activities, F. M. wrote the following letter to the WCBC attorney in Washington concerning the FCC’s part in a coming WARC world conference. The letter outlines the future plans that were in the minds of the WCBC Board of Directors at that time.


The reference in the following letter to possible plans for a short wave radio broadcasting station in East Tennessee came about as follows. Maurice and Marie Hall happened to own some fairly large acreage of wooded property atop the Tennessee Plateau near Tracy City, Tennessee. Maurice, a member of the WCBC Board of Directors, offered WCBC the use of this property to construct another short wave radio station, with programming directed toward Europe and South America, if the Board should desire to build a station there. F. M., who was beginning his work with WCBC in 1981, was asked at that time to inspect the property and report concerning its possible application in WCBC future plans. F. M. and Charlotte drove by the property on one of their trips from Virginia to Alabama and F. M. spent several hours walking through and inspecting the acreage. He reported through Bob Scott to the Board that the property would be suitable for construction of a short wave radio station beaming programs to Europe and South America. That report still exists in the archives of WCBC.


A copy of the letter for the FCC concerning participation in the WARC conference follows:


“Please reply to:

P O Box 473

Anchor Point, Alaska 99556

12 November 1982


“Mr Larry A. Blosser

Fisher, Wayland, Cooper and Leader

1100 Connecticut Ave, N. W.

Washington, D. C. 20036


“Dear Mr. Blosser:


“We understand that representatives of the FCC will be attending a World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC) early in 1983 at which the future use of the international short wave radio broadcasting bands by various countries will be discussed. Would you please convey to the FCC officials the plans of our organization, the World Christian Broadcasting Corporation, for future use of these bands.


“As you know, we have already been issued a construction permit by the FCC to construct a short wave broadcasting facility (KNLS) at Anchor Point, Alaska utilizing a single 100 KW transmitter and two antennas beamed to zones 18-35, 41-45, 49 and 50. This station will be ready to go on-the-air by July 1983 with at least 12 hours of programming per day. The facilities for this station have been designed and are being constructed to allow the addition of two more 100 KW transmitters and expansion of the antenna system to beam broadcasts to zones 17 thru 45. Tentatively, by 1985 we expect to have these three transmitters operating simultaneously with some 54 to 60 hours of programming daily.


“During 1984 we plan to present to the FCC an application for another international short wave broadcasting facility to be located in the U, S. (possibly in eastern Tennessee) or in a U. S. Carribean possession. The intended zones of reception for this station will be zones 10 thru 16, 27 thru 29, 36 thru 39, 46 thru 48, and 52. This station may go on-the-air with 12 or more program hours per day over a single 100 KW transmitter by 1985.


“We would expect to expand this station to operate for 60 program hours per day over three 100 KW transmitters by 1987.


“We trust that the FCC officials involved in the WARC will be able to safeguard our rights to utilize the necessary spectrum space required by these plans.


“Sincerely,


“Francis M. Perry

Director of Engineering

cc: Dr. Robert E. Scott, President .”

_________________________________________________


The WCBC schedule for the starting of broadcasts from an Alaska station, since the first day F. M. was asked to serve as an advisor, had been set as July 1983. It was November 1982 and the schedule to start broadcasting eight months hence in July 1983 appeared to be feasible. It had been noticed that the rules and regulations of the FCC called for an application for the specific frequencies for broadcasts be submitted to the FCC at least six months before their scheduled use. Therefore, with the help of the propagation analysis capability of TCI, F. M. had determined the frequencies for the opening broadcasts. Thus began a regular practice of frequency request submissions four times a year, always six months ahead of actual need. The first submission was by means of the following letter:


“Please reply to:

P O Box 473

Anchor Point, Alaska 99556

30 November 1982


“Federal Communications Commission

1919 M Street, N. W.

Washington, D. C. 20554


“Attn: Mr. Charles Breig, Policy & Rules Division, Mass Media Bureau


“Re: Tentative July/August 1983 High Frequency Program Test Schedule

        File: BPIB 811023MI. Call Sign: KNLS.


“Dear Mr. Breig:


“Construction of short wave radio broadcasting station KNLS is on schedule and the station should be ready to conduct Program Tests by mid-July 1983. Consequently, we are submitting our frequency-hour request, with supporting propagation data, for that period.


“The FOT curves as well as the data on signal to noise ratio and field strength of the signal at the receiving end of the circuits are based on analyses made by Technology for Communications International (TCI) of Mountain View, California (using proqram HFMUFES 3, 74/12/30). The predicted sunspot number for the period July/ August 1983 is taken from NOAA's solar Geophyslcal Data Prompt Report for September 1982, Number 457, Part 1, Page 11.


“Pertinent data for this frequency-hour request are summarized on three attached charts. A copy of the complete data calculated at TCI is also attached.


“It should be noted that one of the propagation paths (azimuth 360 degrees) traverses the auroral zone. The propagation analysis presented for this path does not take into effect the special characteristics of the auroral ionosphere. The data presented for this path can only be considered to be a first approximation. Study of this path continues and it later may become necessary to request a change of frequency for this path.


“We hereby request authorization to conduct Program Tests as indicated on the attached tentative frequency-hour request. Total time requested is 12 hours per day.


“Sincerely,


“Francis M. Perry

Director of Engineering

cc: Dr. Robert E. Scott, President.”

______________________________________________


                 INTERNATIONAL BROADCAST STATION KNLS

                             Tentative Frequency Hour Request

                 0100 GMT Ju1y 18, 1983 to 0100 GMT Sept. 4, 1983


Freq. Power Time Target Azimuth Gain Vert.* Azimuth

KHz KW Emission GMT Zones Distance Degrees Dbd Lobe Bm Width


11,820 100 10A3 0700-1100 20,21,22 4,000 to 330 20 6deg 24deg

                                                        30,31,32 8,000 km


9,620 100 10A3 1100-1500 42,43,44, 800 to 300 20 60deg 240deg

                                                                        8,000 Km


11,820 100 10A3 1500-1900 19,29 5,000 to 360 14 23deg 68deg

                                                                        8,000 Km

Languages and Times

   0700-1100 Russian, 11,820 KHz.

   1100-1500 Chinese (Mandarin), 9,620 KHz

   1500-1900 Russian, 11,820 KHz.


* Beamwidth at V2 power points.

___________________________________________________


During November 1982 F. M. became aware that WCBC, as an employer of workmen, was required to file a certain Form 1002 with the State of Alaska Employment Security Division to determine WCBC’s liability for contributions under the Alaska Employment Security Act. WCBC had failed to meet this requirement by about five months because we should have been filing monthly since we began hiring part time employees in July 1982. Actually, the reason we had not filed the proper form was that we had not known about the Act. After discussion of the matter with the attorney, Mr. C. R. Baldwin, F. M. sent the following letter to the State of Alaska in an effort to rectify the situation:


“World Christian Broadcasting Corporation

P O Box 473

Anchor Point, Alaska 99556

17 November 1982


“Employment Security Division

Alaska Department of Labor

Box 3-7000

Juneau, Alaska 99811


“Gentlemen:


“It has just come to our attention that we are required to file the attached Form 1002 with the Employment Security Division to determine our liability for contribution under the Alaska Employment Security Act. We are a nonprofit religious organization incorporated under the laws of the state of Texas, We do not have liability for such contributions in the state of Texas or to the Federal Government. We assumed that under those conditions we did not have liability in the state of Alaska. We now have discovered that we should have filed the attached form last July. We assure you that our failure to file was inadvertent and we desire now to rectify this error by doing whatever is necessary. The completed form 1002 is attached together with other material which we hope will help you to recommend our status.


“In our home office in Texas (P 0 Box 3857, Abilene, Texas 79604) we have a

letter from the IRS indicating that we are a non-profit corporation exempt from Federal income taxes under Section 501 (C) (3). We carry full worker compensation and liability insurance with U. S. Fire Co., P O Box 2639, Dallas, Texas. Our policy No. is 408190191. This company has "all states indorsement.” The Alaska representative of our insurance company is Industrial Indemnity, P O Box 307, Anchorage, Alaska 99501.


“Attached is a summary of our entire employment from the first day of our operation in Alaska on July 1,1982 to the end of the last semi-monthly period on Nov. 15, 1982. There are only two permanent employees and it is their job to manage the construction of a religious broadcasting station. Most of the construction is being done by contract to other Alaska businesses. However, we found it necessary to temporarily employ a few people directly. All of these individuals have worked for us only intermittently and a number of them have now been terminated. Five individuals are presently employed on a temporary basis to be terminated on or about November 30, 1982. Until approximately April 1983 when we start to gather a permanent operating staff of 7 to 10 people, we will have only two permanent employees.


“We respectfully request that our employment should be excluded under the Alaska Employment Security Act because it involves services performed for a church. The World Christian Broadcasting Corporation is operated by members of the Church of Christ for evangelistic purposes. Most of the Alaska employees listed are members of the Church of Christ and many of them have donated a portion of their time or have accepted low rates of pay as a means of making donations to the organization. All of the funds which we have for construction and operation of the station here at Anchor Point have come or will come from free will donations by members of the Church of Christ toward the preaching of the Christian gospel over international short wave radio to Asia and the Far East.


“Should it be determined that we must participate in the unemployment insurance program, we will then elect to pay the Alaska unemployment insurance taxes under the "reimbursable payment plan" if we may be allowed to do so.


“We apologize for our failure to file last July and trust that this error can be rectified at this time. Please let us know what steps to take next.


“Sincerely,


“Francis M. Perry

Director of Engineering

cc: Dr. Robert E. Scott, President, Abilene, Texas.


Attachment.”

_________________________________________________


WORLD CHRISTIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION EMPLOYMENT RECORD

(at Anchor Point, Alaska) 17 November 1982


Name Started Terminated Total Number

                                                 work work Hrs. of days

Former temporary employees


Jane M. Austin 8/10/82 9/24/82 168 21

Robert L. Austin 9/2/82 9/2/82 9.5 1

John W. Wahlstrom 7/26/82 8/6/82 80 10

Hignacio L. Huerta 8/1/82 11/12/82 480 60

Clifford L. Jones, Sr. 7/14/82 8/29/82 316 42

John Paul Jones 7/24/82 8/29/82 124.5 23

Kevin W. Jones 7/6/82 9/14/82 268 39

Lisa R. Jones 8/18/82 8/18/82 12 1

Jody L. Krout 8/9/82 9/24/82 187.5 21

Susan M. Ledger 8/13/82 9/22/82 100.5 11

Tim A. Smith 8/11/82 9/10/82 158.5 21


Present Temporary Emp1oyees


Brent A. Dodge 11/15/82* 290 39

David W. Elsberry 9/3/82 11/15/82* 328.75 42

Travis E. Mooney 9/3/82 11/15/82* 349.75 45

Tim L. Splane 9/13/82 11/15/82* 308.5 39

Bill L. Williams 9/10/82 11/15/82* 321 43


Permanent Employees


Kevin K. Chambers 7/1/82 11/15/82**

Francis M. Perry 7/1/82 11/15/82**


*to be terminated about 11/30/82, date last paid 11/15/82.

** date last paid, permanent employee.


Francis M. Perry, 11/17/82


A number of items were ordered from the antenna manufacturer, TCI, to be used in the installation of the antennas. We were having items such as transmission lines pre-fabricated to exactly fit the dimensions of the WCBC antenna field. This required some telephone as well as letter communication:


“Please reply to:

P O Box 473

Anchor Point, Alaska 99556

8 November 1982


“Mr Owen Thompson

Applications Engineer

TCI, 1625 Stierlin Road

Mountain View, California 94043


“Re: Our order for Transmission Line (Harris Order No 21253)


“Dear Owen:


“Finally, after pouring all necessary concrete foundations, we have been able to get measurements "as built" for the distance between transmission line supports to our Model 611 and Model 516-3 antennas. We hope the attached sketch indicates fully how we ma1e measurements so that TCI can tailor the transmission line to our needs.


“The Model 611 antenna requires at least 439.5 feet of transmission line. This

measurement was made from the center of the End Pole Assembly (next to the transmitter bldg) to the center of the pole which supports the feed point for the Model 611 antenna.


“The Model 516-3 antenna requires a total length of at least 773.22 feet. This

measurement was made as follows: 673.22 feet from the center of the End Pole

Assembly (next to the transmitter building) to the work point for the first Turns Assembly, plus 50 feet to the work point for the second Turns Assembly, plus 50 feet to the center of the front Support Pole for the Model 516-3 antenna. A few extra feet may be required to connect from the Support Pole to the antenna curtain.


“In addition to the transmission line, we require two End Pole Assemblies and two Standard Turns Assemblies. It would be appreciated if you would indicate to us exactly where we should place the wood support poles for the transmission line (how far apart on each transmission line run).


“We trust that final assembly of our transmission line can now be started so that we can get shipment as soon as possible.


“Sincerely,


“Francis M. Perry

Direct or of Engineering

cc: Mr. Gary Hunziker, Harris Corp.

Dr. Robert E. Scott, WCBC, Abilene, Texas.”

________________________________________________________


“TCI, TECHNOLOGY FOR COMMUNICATIONS INTERNATIONAL


“November 22, 1982

File No. 5378


“World Christian Broadcasting Corporation

P.O. 473

Anchor Point, Alaska 99556


“Attention: Mr. F. M. Perry, Director of Engineering


“Dear Mr. Perry:


“In reference to your letter of November 8th 1982 concerning the transmission line requirements for your 611 and 516-3 antennas, we have the following comments.


“TCI drawing 173-STG-00T shows the general plan of the site and the transmission line runs. Your "as built" dimensions are almost exactly as indicated by the amounts we planned for each run. We shall be supplying a total of 24 sections of transmission line each of a standard length of 16 meters. “This is a total line length of 1259.9 feet which is approximately 47 feet more than your measured requirements. Additionally, a certain amount of extra wire is usually included in our kits as "installation spares". There should, therefore, be no danger that you run out of wire. This amount is actually 52 feet in excess of the ordered quantity of 360 m.


“As far as fittings for the poles are concerned, we shall be supplying two turn poles and two end poles complete with hardware as well as attachment hardware for 24 intermediate wooden support poles (this is in slight excess of your actual requirements and should provide some spares). These poles and turn assemblies are part numbers 17 and 18 on drawing 173-STG-00T, whilst the attachment hardware and wire are part numbers 19 and 20.


“As far as the placement of the wooden transmission line poles goes, we

recommend that you follow 173-STG-00T sheet 1 as closely as possible. The run from the transmitter building to the 516-3 is a straight line between the building and the first turn. It should be mapped-out starting at the work-point of the first turn assembly and working towards the building, spacing the poles every 16.00 meters apart in 12 sections, finally leaving a distance of approximately 13.9 meters for the section nearest the transmitter building.


“The run between the transmitter building and the 611 curtain should be made in a similar manner to that of the 516-3 except that there will be two non-standard sections near the transmitter building. The further from the building should be 12.00 meters between pole centers while the nearer will be approximately 10 meters. I hope this clarifies the positioning of the poles.


“With regard to the manufacture of the line, TCI will be shipping wire material, pole attachment fittings and insulators which will then have to be assembled on site according to TCI drawings 026-TML-00T and 094-TML-OOT. Very little factory pre-assembly is possible, unfortunately, due to the difficulties that this would entail in packaging and shipping. The exact positions of the support poles are, therefore, not as critical as one might think, although the line has been designed with electrical compensation and so deviations from the recommended spacings are not advised.


“Should you have any further questions regarding the transmission line

installation, please do not hesitate to contact myself or Mr. Thompson. I am

enclosing the latest versions of drawings 173-STG-OOT and 026-TML-OOT for your reference.


“In reference to your letter of 12th November to Mr. Hunziker, the change order we recently received from Harris deletes the lamp failure alarm for the tower lights (thus reducing the contract value.) The primary supply remains as 230V AC on their order. It is now, unfortunately, not possible to change this item since the towers and lighting material have already been shipped direct to you from our supplier. Should you wish to have a 120V system, we can arrange for the return of the lighting equipment and replacement with 120V components which would involve packing and shipping costs and a possible re-stocking charge. Please let us know as soon as possible if you wish to substitute 120V components.


“On the subject of supply voltage, we are currently assembling and wiring the 5-position slewing switch for your 611 antenna and we would be grateful if you could let us know the 3-phase voltage supply you have available at Anchor Point. Inter-phase and line-to-neutral voltage values would both be appreciated. Having the motors correctly wired at the factory will, of course, facilitate the switch installation and commissioning.


“Yours sincerely,


“Gordon G. Sinclair

Senior Antenna Engineer

Project Manager.”

_____________________________________________________


The following letter from Bob Scott with notes of encouragement from Board Members arrived in late November:


“WORLD CHRISTIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION

P.O. Box 3857

301 South Pioneer Drive

Abilene, Texas 79604 Suite 103

(915) 698-0695

November 23,1982


“Mr. F.M. Perry

Box 473

Anchor Point, AK 99556


“Dear F .M. ,


“A man named Gordon Sinclair of TCI called yesterday. He had been unable to reach you by phone. I assume that by the time this reaches you that he will have been able to contact you. He assured me they were sending enough transmission line, perhaps 50' more than ordered. They also need to know more about the supply voltage to slewing switch. Something about phase to phase. I suggested he try again. If he hasn't reached you, and in case I don't talk with you before this reaches you, he wants you to call him. As you probably know, his number is (405) 961-9180, Ex 281.


“Enclosed are a couple of notes from Board members I was asked to pass along to you and Charlotte. Sorry for the delay in getting them off.


“Ed Davis had open heart surgery last week. He is already home and seems to be doing well.


“Our weather has finally begun to be cool. Up till now it's been almost like spring for sometime. Nothing to compare with your weather, I'm sure.


“Enclosed is a copy of the coverage map we recently had printed. Progress is being made in our capital funding. Much hard work lies ahead, but we are confident God is able to help us reach our common objective. Our aim every day is to be an instrument in His hand to accomplish His purposes.


“We pray for you and continue to thank God for your presence in this vital and unique project. Special greetings to Kevin and family, as well as to all the good people at Anchor Point.


“Brotherly,


“Robert E. Scott

Enclosures.”


“WCBC Meeting

November 13, 1982


“Dear F. M. and Charlotte,


“We’re here praying and thinking of ways to continue in a greater way what has been begun.


“May God bless you in the work there. We appreciate so much what you are doing for Christ and for the cause of World Evangelism.


“Marie and I are so happy to be a part of this great work with you, Bob. Cline, George, Chuck, and the others. Keep it up and isn’t it great to be co-workers with God.


“Love,


“Maurice and Marie (Hall).”

_______________________________________________


“November 13, 1982


“Dear F. M. and Charlotte,


“Just to say thank you for all you’re doing. We think of you and pray for you daily. Bob showed us some of the slides you’ve sent and we’re amazed at the progress. From roads to antenna bases to transmitter building, what an undertaking. God certainly sent you both for His glory.


“Your partner with Christ,


“George Bridges.”

________________________________________________


December 1982 -


Finally the tower foundations were finished and it was time to start erection of the four towers. Work was to continue all winter. [The winter of 1982/83 was one of the mildest in many years, we were told. There was only a little snow on the antenna field which proved to be very helpful to the crews doing tower erection and earth anchor insertion.] Following is the letter requesting bidders for tower erection:


“Please reply to:

P O Box 473

Anchor Point, Alaska 99556

Telephone 907-235-8262

8 December 1982


“To: Prospective Bidders


“Subject: Installation of Antenna Towers, Slewino Switch, and RF Transmission

               Lines.


“The World Christian Broadcasting Corporation (WCBC) solicits quotations from

experienced contractors for installation of 4 each antenna towers, 1 each slewing switch, and approximately 1220 feet of open wire 300 ohm R F transmission line. The contract will be for installation services only. Foundations for the towers and support poles and earth anchors for all tower guys have already been installed. WCBC will supply all material and equipment to be incorporated in the installation. The contractor must provide all labor, personnel, equipment, tools, supplies, and expertise to complete the installation.


“An all weather gravel road has been built to the center of each of the two antenna areas. Timber has been cleared, stumps have been removed, and the necessary working area around the towers and guy points has been graded. The soil is expected to be frozen to sufficient depth to support contractor equipment.


“WCBC intends to award a contract for this work during December 1982 so that work may be started early in January 1983. WCBC desires the installation work to be completed by February 28, 1983 if at all possible.


“Drawings and specifications may be viewed at the WCBC office which is located at the antenna site one mile east of the Sterlinq Highway at mile 160.9 South. Take the gravel road marked "Norman Lowell Studio". Bidders should visit the site before preparing their quotations.


“WCBC reserves the right to reject any or all bids.


“Francis M. Perry

Director of Engineering.”

______________________________________________________


In discussing the tower lighting with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), we found that lights on the two shorter towers would not be necessary if we fulfilled the requirements for lighting on the two taller towers. However, FCC specifications and our construction permit still called for lighting on all four towers. The following letters record F. M.’s effort to get the FCC to waive the lighting (and associated expense) requirements for lighting on the two shorter towers:


“Please reply to:

P. O. Box 413

Anchor Point, Alaska 99556

6 December 1982 .


“Mr. Larry A. Blosser

Fisher, Wayland, Cooper and Leader

1100 Connecticut Avenue, N. W.

Washington, D. C;. 20036


“Dear Mr. Blosser:


“Would you please look over the enclosed letter which I have addressed to Mr. Charles Breig of the FCC. If it appears to be in order, please pass the request on to Mr. Breig.


“The FAA has granted us relief from their liqhting requirements on two of our antenna towers. If the FCC will delete the requirement for lighting on those two towers, we can save several thousand dollars of material and installation costs.


“Thanks for your help.


“Sincerely,


“Francis M. Perry

Director of Engineering

cc: Dr. Robert E. Scott, President.”

_________________________________________________


“Please reply to:

P O Box 473

Anchor Point, Alaska 99556

6 December 1982


“Federal Communications Commission

1919 M Street, N. W.

Washington, D C 20554


“Attn: Mr. Charles Breig, Policy & Rules Division, Mass Media Bureau


“Re: Request for change in Obstruction Marking Specifications of International Broadcasting Station KNLS Construction Permit File No. BPIB- 811023MI


“Dear Mr. Breig:


“We respectfully request that the portion of the obstruction marking specification on our Construction Permit requiring lighting of the two 145 foot towers of our Log Periodic Antenna (TCI Model 516-3) be deleted.


“The Federal Aviation Administration office in Anchorage, Alaska has completed study No. 82-AAL-172-0E concerning the construction of the four towers of our antenna system (2 towers of height 363 feet for TCI Model 611 antenna and 2 towers of height 145 feet for TCI Model 516-3 antenna). Of course, the study results require that the tower system be liqhted. However, in discussing the study with the FAA (Mr. Terry Wiley, telephone 907-271-5902) we were informed that lighting is required only on the two 363 foot towers. Lighting is not required by the FAA on the two 145 foot towers because of their close physical location to the taller towers.


“We propose to paint all four of the towers throughout their height with alternate bands of aviation surface orange and white as specified on our FCC Construction Permit. We also propose to light the two 363 foot towers as specified on our FCC Construction Permit. However, in view of the FAA finding that lighting on the two 145 foot towers is not required, we request that the FCC requirement for such lighting be deleted.


“Our construction schedule calls for actual erection of the towers in January 1983.


“Thank you for your help.


“Sincerely,


“Francis M. Perry

Director of Engineering

cc: Dr. Robert E. Scott, President.”

_____________________________________________________


The following letter increases the work and the size of the contract with Denali Drilling, the contractor for earth anchor insertion:


“Please reply to:

P O Box 473

Anchor Point, Alaska 99556

16 December 1982


“Mr. Edward Aberle, Superintendent

Denali Drilling, Inc.

6000 A Street

Anchorage, Alaska 99502


“Dear Mr Aberle:


“While you are on our site installing earth anchors, would you please consider completing for us the following additional work:


“Provide and set up a quantity of 20 transmission line wood poles in accordance with the attached sketch.


“Please look over the attached sketch and let us have your quotation for the setting of these poles. We would work with you in setting these poles in the same way in which we will work with you on the earth anchors, providing reference points to precisely locate the poles and to keep snow cover out of the way.


“If we can come to a mutual agreement on this additional work, perhaps you can transport the poles down to the site from an Anchorage supplier when you come down to start work on the earth anchors.


“Please call me at 907-235-8262 with your reply.


“Sincerely,


“Francis M. Perry

Director of Engineering.”

______________________________________________________


The following letter was received from TCI announcing the shipment of instruction manuals for the assembly of antennas:


“TCI, TECHNOLOGY FOR COMMUNICATIONS INTERNATIONAL

16 December 1982


“Mr. F. M. Perry

World Christian Broadcasting Corp.

P. O. Box 473

Anchor Point, Alaska 99556


“Dear Mr. Perry:


“Please find enclosed two copies of the instruction manuals for the installation of TCI Model 611 4/4/1 6/7/9/11 MHz antenna and slewing switch system. These manuals contain the most recent revisions of all the drawings associated with the antenna installation. The manuals for the 5l6-3AlOO antenna should arrive with the 5l6-3A-lOO equipment.


“In the Model 611 manual you will find that 086-TWR-OOT has been revised to show our tower manufacturer's latest design. This mainly affects the ladder attachment hardware. You will also discover that 069-LTG-OOT, the 611 tower lighting kit, has not been supplied. We are, at present, awaiting complete information from our supplier before completing this drawing. We will forward it as soon as it is available.


“Please do not hesitate to contact me or Mr. Thompson if you should have any questions regarding your antenna installation.


“Yours sincerely,


“Gordon G. Sinclair

Senior Antenna Engineer.”

______________________________________________________


To get ready to test the antennas in the summer, F. M. dispatched the following letter to the consultant at the University of Alaska, Dr. Robert D. Hunsucker:


“Please reply to:

P O Box 473

Anchor Point, Alaska 99556

Telephone 907-235-8262

17 December 1982


“Robert D. Hunsucker, Phd

Alaska Telecommunication Associates

S. R. Box 30168

Fairbanks, Alaska 99701


“Dear Dr. Hunsucker:


“We are happy to announce that our plan to build an international short wave broadcasting station at Anchor Point, Alaska are being carried out. We are putting the final touches on the transmitter/studio building and the foundations for the antenna systems. During this winter we will be assembling the transmitter and erecting the antennas so that on-the-air testing can start in April 1983. We are preparing to start actual programming to China and the USSR in July 1983.


“It now becomes necessary for us to make seasonal frequency-hour requests to the FCC in order to clear transmitting frequencies. We based our first frequency-hour request (copy attached) on a mid-latitude propagation analysis. But we noted in our letter to the FCC that the frequencies requested would probably not be optimum for propagation paths through the auroral zone. We need to develop a method and procedure for determining an operating frequency each season for the auroral zone path. Is there any way short of a propagation analysis by Stanford Research Institute by which we could reasonably determine viable frequencies each season? Is it possible that we could apply some "rule of thumb" to the result of mid-latitude propagation analysis and determine more useful frequencies for the Anchor Point to Moscow path?


“If you think you could work out a procedure for determining operating frequencies which we could then repeat with relative ease just prior to each of our seasonal frequency-hour requests to the FCC, we would like to consider retaining your services to do so.


“For your information, we must make frequency-hour requests to the FCC six months 1n advance of each of the four annual seasons based on propagation analyses utilizing predicted sunspot numbers as follows:


“Summer season: May, June, July & Auqust (using SS No. for July).

Fall season: September & October (using SS No. for October) .

Winter season: November, December, January &, February (using SS No. for Jan)

Spring season: March & April (usinq SS No. for April).


“We have two antennas with characteristics as follows:


“1. TCI Model 611 curtain dipole array with a center beam gain of about 20 db. It is electronically slewable in azimuth to 270, 285, 300, 315, and 330 degrees directing the beam from Japan to Novosibirsk, USSR. The take off angle for this antenna varies from about 7 degrees to 10 degrees depending on frequency. The vertical beam width between half power points is about 6 degrees while the azimuth beam width between half power points is about 24 degrees. This antenna is designed for three of the international broadcast bands (5,950 -6,200 kHz; 9,500 -9,775 kHz; and 11,700 -11,975 kHz). This antenna will be used primarily for mid-latitude propagation paths. However, at the 330 degree slew position, the beam may intersect the auroral zone.


“2. TCI Model 516-3 log periodic array with a center beam gain of about 14Db. Its beam is centered at 0 degrees azimuth. Althouqh its take off angle is about 20 degrees, its vertical beam width is relatively wide with 23 degrees between half power points. It has an azimuth beam width between half power points of 68 degrees. This antenna is designed for 5 of the international broadcast bands (adding the 15,100 -15,450 kHz; and the 17,700 -17,900 KHz bands to those indicated for the 611 antenna above.) As you can see, this antenna is fixed to fire through the auroral zone at all times.


“We would appreciate any help you can give us concerning a reasonable basis for our frequency-hour requests to the FCC.


“Sincerely,


“Francis M. Perry

Director of Engineering

cc: Dr. Robert E. Scott, President.”

__________________________________________________


Bob Scott wrote the following letter of commendation to both Charlotte and F. M. just before Christmas 1982:


“WORLD CHRISTIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION

P.O. Box 3857

301 South Pioneer Drive

Abilene, Texas 79604 Suite 103

(915) 698-0695

December 20, 1982


“Mr. and Mrs. Francis M. Perry

Box 473

Anchor Point, AK 99556


“Dear F.M. and Charlotte,


"God has used the two of you in a most unusual way to help us come this point in our project. I honestly believe that there would have been no way for us to make it to this point had God not provided you to help us in your many faceted ways.


"Enclosed are some additional materials that you will need. One of the items is a revised list of account numbers to be used on your payroll. You will note that we have changed the numbers somewhat. You should discard the old numbers you were using and use these from this point on. Notice that they are five digit numbers rather than three digit numbers.


"We are working very hard to complete our funding. There is still a long hill to climb, but we are confident God is able to help us reach the objective before us.


"I look forward to the prospect of seeing you when you come to the lower 48 in January. May God bless you every day as you serve Him and may this be a happy holiday season for you in every way.


"Gratefully,

Robert E. Scott

Enclosures."

_______________________________________________________


Here is F.M.’s final letter of the year to Bob Scott trying to provide details on studio, control, and test equipment that needed to be put on order as soon as possible:


“World Christian Broadcasting Corporation

P O Box 473

Anchor Point, Alaska 99556

22 December 1982


“Dear Bob:


“Finally, here is my recommended list of studio, control, and test equipment for purchase as soon as possible. The list represents minimum equipment for the initial phase of our programming, as I understand it. I have made some last minute deletions based on my telephone conversation with you today in which you informed me that we would not be programming news initially. Here are some comments about this equipment:


“Although we will not normally be originating live programs from Anchor Point, we think it expedient that we set up two rooms from which live broadcasts can originate. This simply means that the rooms will be equipped with microphones, cueing speakers, and announcer headsets. One of these two rooms should be equipped as a recording studio. It will have 2 disc transcription turntables, a used but rebuilt Ampex Model 440B reel to reel tape R/P machine, an I. T. C. Mono Tape Cartridge R/P machine, a Harris Gatesway 80, 8 channel Mono Console, and microphones and speakers. This room and its equipment will serve three purposes:


“1. Possible live broadcasts either emergency or planned -we might need the turntables to fill in with music.


“2. Recording studio to prepare tapes or just to cue and put "finishing touches" on tapes received from the lower 48.


“3. Back up to the transmitter control equipment. If the transmitter console should develop a problem, then this room with its Gatesway 80 console could feed the transmitter directly. That is the reason for putting a Gatesway 80 console in this room. We need two of these (another will be in the transmitter control area) in case one of them needs maintenance.


“Normally the transmitter will be fed with tape playing equipment, using pre recorded tapes, mounted in the Transmitter control area. In this area will be three more Ampex 440B used but rebuilt R/P open reel machines. Two will be for constant use and one for back up. Tape machines in continuous use have to be taken out of service about once each 6 months for maintenance. There will also be another I. T. C. Mono Tape Cartridge R/P machine here and three single deck I.T C Cartridge players. Also in this area will be the other Gatesway 80 control console which will switch, mix, and control the level of the various program sources (tape players, live microphones, disc players, telephone links, etc) to the transmitter.


“The signal processing equipment (Harris MSP-90), the modulation monitor, and the frequency monitor will be located in a rack in the open transmitter control area.


“Test equipment will be stored in the workshop and used either in the workshop or at locations around the equipment where maintenance must be done.


“A room is ready for the news service teletype receiver but this will be left vacant at present. When we do start a news service, if it is run from Anchor Point, the service will probably also require other sources for news such as radio receivers and television sets.


“At present we plan no factory made furniture in these rooms. We plan to custom build shelves and formica covered table-top surfaces to hold equipment and to serve as desks for announcers and users of the proper tape production equipment.


“We will try to keep the areas as open as possible so that the actual staff of the station can furnish the rooms as convenient and desirable to them after some practice sessions and experience.


“We do not plan to pick out or purchase furniture for the offices, reception, and employee's lounge areas until we qet further instructions from you. However, Kevin and I would like to purchase a couple of tables (formica top similar to those used in Sunday School rooms, about 6 or 7 feet long) and some chairs for our own use immediately.


“The following list includes new equipment which we can order from the Harris Corp. if there is any advantage to doing so. Harris may be able to get faster delivery on some of the items. Of course, a number of the items are made by Harris. Should we have the Harris Corp. add these items to our present order for payment from your office, or should I order them for payment from Anchor Point? At any rate, I can make the necessary contact with Harris to get a firm quote, and I can place the order and get shipment if you want. I'll wait for an answer from you before contacting anyone.


“The prices on this list are budgetary. We need a firm quote on them.


New Items to be Or1ered from the Harris Corp.


 1. 1 each Harris MSP-90 AGC/AM Limiter Assembly (stock no 994-8205-001) $2,280.

 2. 1 each Harris AM-90 Modulation Monitor (stock No 994-8424-001) $1,430.

 3. 1 each Semi-conductor Kit for MSP-90 (stock No 999-0962-000) $133.

 4. 1 each Semi-conductor Kit for AM-90 (stock No 994-8513-001) $227.

 5. 1 each Encore 77, 2 way Speaker System (stock No 772-0097-000) $239.

 6. 2 each Harris CB-120l 12 inch transcription turntable drilled for tone arm (stock No. 994-7866-001) $940.

 7. 2 each Micro-track 303 Tone Arm, 12 inch (Stock No 723-0268-000) $240.

 8. 2 each Mono I C. Phono Pre-Amp $990.

 9. 1 each Spare parts kits for Phone Pre-Amp $50.

10. 2 each Stanton 500E Phone Cartridge (Stock No 723-0304-000) $36.

11. 2 each Stanton Replacement Cartridge, D5l00E $24.

12. 3 each Electro Voice RE-20 Microphone (Stock No 730-0270-000) $1,335.

13 12 each Luxo LM-l Ad1ustable Mike Arm (Stock No 720-0343-000) $56.

14. 2 each Desk Mount for Mike Arms. $8.

15. 3 each Sennheiser Headset Model HO-424-14 $345.

16. 2 each Gatesway 80, 8 channel Mono Console (Stock No994-6699-001)$9,990

17. 2 each Semi-conductor kit for Gatesway 80 Console (Stock No 990-6710-000)

                 $118.

18. 2 each Spare Parts Kit for CB-120l (Stock No 994-8463-001) $88.

19. 2 each Hew1ett Packard HP-538lA Frequency Counter $978.

20. 1 each Rack Adapter for HP-5381A Frequency Counter $87.

21. 1 each Oscilloscope, Tektronix TEK 2215, DC to 60 MHz dual trace $1,450.

22. 2 each I.T.C. RP-0003 Mono Tape Cartridrre Rip machine $4,760.

23 3 each I.T.C. Mono Single Deck Tape Cartridge Play-back only machine $7,000.

24. 1 each T. F. T. Emerqency Broadcast Monitor (required by FCC) $1,050.


Estimated Total above 24 items - $33,854.


“Following is another list of required equipment which we can purchase used. Some of the miscellaneous items may be new. Ken Kretzer will help us get these items:


 1. 4 each Ampex 4408 Open Reel Rip Tape Machines, rebuil@. $2300 each $9,200

 2. 1 set Audio Test Equipment (Rional Generator, Dist, Analyzer Digital VM, etc. to be purchased from used market) $1,000.

 3. 2 each Cassette Recorders (to be used only if we get programs on cassette tapes. Actually not advisable to use cassette tapes but we may need to some time) $1,000.

 4. 1 each Oscilloscope, Tektronix Model I 543, rebuilt, with accessories $500.

 5. 1 each Receiver, TMC R390B, rebuilt, (already purchased) $400.

 6. 1 lot Miscellaneous equipment, racks, meters, degaussers, test leads, probes, tools, backscatter circuitry to set up backscatter tests,etc $5,000.

 

“Total for above 6 items $17,100.


“These totals do not include packing and shipping. For that add $3,000.


“We need to get these items on order right away. I have taken the liberty to order the radio receiver already, also one of the Ampex 440B tape recorders. I want to see what it is like before I commit for the other three. But I am assured that it is like new. With periodic maintenance, say every six months, this tape recorder will last for many, many years. Each time it is properly maintained, it starts out like new again. Some of the bearings have to be chanced from time to time.


“I'll be waiting to hear from you. Perhaps you would like to send a copy of this letter to John Fisk.


“Best wishes,


“F. M. Perry.”

________________________________________________


(To be continued.)